An Observation, Briefly

I started this blog so that you and I could talk about books, old, new or true.
When I post about a new book, the result is a handful of views and a spattering of likes.
When I post about an old book, it receives exponentially more views, likes, comments and even, in one instance, was Freshly Pressed.
Though being Freshly Pressed results in an rapid rise in the number of followers, the ratio of activity and interest for new books vs old books is constant.
Perhaps we prefer to read opinions when we have formed one of our own?
Or can I infer we prefer to read reviews of books that we have at least heard of?
I for one decide to read a ‘recommended’ book based on a number of recommendations, sometimes accumulated over years.

However, I have been astounded, flabbergasted and surprised to no end that, excluding divine intervention by the wordpress editors, the posts of my original, creative writing have almost without exception received double the number of views and likes when compared with any book review I’ve written. I sometimes wonder whether this is more to do with the saturation of the Book Review topic in the WordPress Reader relative to less popular topics like Poetry…

The creative writing was a by-product of the blog. It was the unexpected result of the giddy spiral that developed from this space and being more frequently in touch with inspiration – other writers, a constant stream of very fine books, blogs and writing. I am humbly grateful for your interest in it.

So, old friends, new followers and passers-by I would like to know what you think about this phenomenon.
For instance,

  • If I were to write short tantalising reviews of new books, long involved discussions about old books and perhaps get a bit more focussed about the original work side of things would that be a welcome change? 
  • If you have a book blog, have you noticed the same old vs new trends?

I have a few posts in the pipeline – stay tuned for a post contrasting the WWII Nazi Germany stories I have read in the last year. There is also more Vonnegut goodness on the way.

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3 responses to “An Observation, Briefly

  1. “The creative writing was a by-product of the blog. It was the unexpected result of the giddy spiral that developed from this space and being more frequently in touch with inspiration – other writers, a constant stream of very fine books, blogs and writing.” ~~ isn’t that the truth!? 🙂 ~ Kat

    P.S. As for old vs new reviews, I think if the “new” review doesn’t capture my interest within the first sentence or two (i.e. in the WordPress reader preview) I am less likely to delve into it, whereas an old, familiar book friend will almost prompt a read. I am constantly throwing recommended reads into my goodreads “to read” list (which lately has been growing faster than the “read” (past tense) list! good things days are growing darker and colder, so I can find a little more reading time!)

  2. I am with Kat. The world is so saturated with new book titles, it can be overwhelming — so if a new title review doesn’t grab my attention immediately, I’m out.

    But if someone is talking about a tried and true fave — perhaps a title I’ve taught or am teaching, I’m more prone to check it out.

    I guess we are programmed to be more receptive to the familiar. Or something.

  3. All the books I review are ‘new’ so I have nothing to compare. But perhaps it is true that we’re drawn to books that are more familiar for whatever reason. I know there are certain types of books I don’t particularly enjoy so if I start reading a review and realise it’s about one of ‘them’ then I won’t read the full review. -shrug- It’s a mystery. 🙂 But grats on being Freshly Pressed!

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